And that's a wrap for season 2! Chris and Jason keep it real one last time. Ep.17.

Episode 17 February 15, 2023 00:34:52
And that's a wrap for season 2! Chris and Jason keep it real one last time. Ep.17.
The Recombobulator Lab
And that's a wrap for season 2! Chris and Jason keep it real one last time. Ep.17.

Feb 15 2023 | 00:34:52

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Hosted By

Jason Graham-Nye Chris Dominic

Show Notes

It’s the last episode of the Recombobulator Lab and Chris and Jason are taking a walk down season 2 memory lane with a little current affairs (Chinese balloon anyone?) thrown in too, because that’s what we do. 

Chinese balloons

Jason asks Chris what is going on in the United States, to which Chris replies nothing. He then asks if Chinese balloons ever float over Australian airspace. Jason points out that 90% of Australia is desert and that there’s nothing to see there.

The Pandemic

Jason and Chris then discuss how it was a bit more difficult to pull of season 2 post-pandemic. The pandemic gave them the chance to slow down and freed up a lot fo their time when they first started The Recombobulator Lab but now they are back to business as usual. 

 

Chris says that pre-recording episodes helped them keep on top of it as they were both travelling a lot with work. 

Highlights of Season Two

To wrap up the episode, Jason and Chris talk about the highlights of season two. They talk about youth alcohol consumption (Ep. 10 with Dr Amy Pennay), fake meat (Ep. 11 with Dr. Tani Khara), and e-cigarettes (Ep. 16 with Dr Laura Crotty). Chris points out that the e-cigarettes episode was terrifying, and that the health harms just aren’t talked about in general conversation. Jason believes this is similar to a lot of the things they discuss on the show. 

 

Other highlights included learning about the BeReal app with Mike Hanley (Ep.9) and getting into the reeds about authoritarianism with Dr Doug Keene (Ep. 4) and discussing guns and gambling in episode 5. 

View Full Transcript

Episode Transcript

1 00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:21,440 Welcome to the Recombobulator Lab with Jason Graham-Nye and Chris Dominic. 2 00:00:21,440 --> 00:00:28,080 Jason just asked me if, what's going on in the United States and I said nothing. 3 00:00:28,080 --> 00:00:34,000 So what I'm going to say now is, hey, do you ever have Chinese balloons floating over your 4 00:00:34,000 --> 00:00:35,000 airspace? 5 00:00:35,000 --> 00:00:37,040 Old dialogue by me. 6 00:00:37,040 --> 00:00:38,040 Does that happen? 7 00:00:38,040 --> 00:00:41,480 I mean, they're closer to you. 8 00:00:41,480 --> 00:00:42,480 What was the quote? 9 00:00:42,480 --> 00:00:48,760 They can get away from a civilian and just suddenly float around. 10 00:00:48,760 --> 00:00:50,880 You don't have to, I mean. 11 00:00:50,880 --> 00:00:52,680 I'm with you. 12 00:00:52,680 --> 00:00:53,680 That's funny. 13 00:00:53,680 --> 00:00:59,480 I find it really funny how in authoritarian countries there's really no sense that you're 14 00:00:59,480 --> 00:01:04,160 ever going to be honest about it. 15 00:01:04,160 --> 00:01:08,600 The way Russia handles the war, the way China talks about every foreign policy thing, it's 16 00:01:08,600 --> 00:01:10,480 like, okay, yeah, sure. 17 00:01:10,480 --> 00:01:11,960 I'm totally with you. 18 00:01:11,960 --> 00:01:14,040 Lots of credibility there. 19 00:01:14,040 --> 00:01:18,840 No, but honestly, you guys are much closer to China. 20 00:01:18,840 --> 00:01:21,680 You're still not like right on China's door or anything. 21 00:01:21,680 --> 00:01:24,320 Well, I think there's nothing to see here. 22 00:01:24,320 --> 00:01:25,320 I mean, think about it. 23 00:01:25,320 --> 00:01:26,320 You put a balloon up. 24 00:01:26,320 --> 00:01:28,320 I mean, those things are huge and amazing. 25 00:01:28,320 --> 00:01:32,560 And you float it over Australia, well, 90% of the country is desert. 26 00:01:32,560 --> 00:01:35,280 It's like looking at Breaking Bad country. 27 00:01:35,280 --> 00:01:37,440 It's like there's nothing to see here. 28 00:01:37,440 --> 00:01:39,520 Literally, there's nothing to see here. 29 00:01:39,520 --> 00:01:42,760 How's it going, Dr. Chin? 30 00:01:42,760 --> 00:01:48,680 Well, other than Uluru, it's been kind of rough. 31 00:01:48,680 --> 00:01:51,880 We're waiting to hit the next coastal city. 32 00:01:51,880 --> 00:01:54,200 Oh, my God. 33 00:01:54,200 --> 00:01:55,440 Literally there's nothing to see here. 34 00:01:55,440 --> 00:01:56,440 Move on. 35 00:01:56,440 --> 00:01:57,440 And on it moves. 36 00:01:57,440 --> 00:02:02,400 Hey, what happened to that cycling back to all the planes? 37 00:02:02,400 --> 00:02:05,360 What happened to the graveyard of all of the Qantas planes? 38 00:02:05,360 --> 00:02:06,720 Actually, it wasn't just Qantas planes. 39 00:02:06,720 --> 00:02:08,200 It was a bunch of planes. 40 00:02:08,200 --> 00:02:09,200 Are they gone now? 41 00:02:09,200 --> 00:02:10,520 It was Singapore Airlines. 42 00:02:10,520 --> 00:02:17,240 Yeah, the Ayrsrock Airport is now empty and all those planes are being recommissioned. 43 00:02:17,240 --> 00:02:21,400 I think you might have heard that story that it was literally snakes on a plane and creatures 44 00:02:21,400 --> 00:02:22,400 on a plane. 45 00:02:22,400 --> 00:02:26,680 And you tried to seal them and they obviously can't seal them perfectly. 46 00:02:26,680 --> 00:02:29,040 So imagine that poor bastard. 47 00:02:29,040 --> 00:02:34,560 So the dude who runs operations at the airport, the sleepiest airport in the world, suddenly 48 00:02:34,560 --> 00:02:40,160 he's looking after 300 747s and he's like gets the call from Singapore Airlines going, 49 00:02:40,160 --> 00:02:42,040 OK, let's fire those bad boys up. 50 00:02:42,040 --> 00:02:44,160 And he's got to open the door. 51 00:02:44,160 --> 00:02:48,400 He opens the door and there's a lot of shuffling around of critters and creatures. 52 00:02:48,400 --> 00:02:49,400 Oh yeah. 53 00:02:49,400 --> 00:02:50,880 Yeah, it's a miracle he didn't die. 54 00:02:50,880 --> 00:02:59,280 Yeah, go ahead and go in there and just make sure there's no Australian deadly animals. 55 00:02:59,280 --> 00:03:03,200 As if the plane isn't living in their home. 56 00:03:03,200 --> 00:03:04,200 Right? 57 00:03:04,200 --> 00:03:05,200 That's something that's so funny. 58 00:03:05,200 --> 00:03:10,200 It's like, OK, dude, you just parked your plane in the middle of the bush. 59 00:03:10,200 --> 00:03:11,200 Anyway, that's awesome. 60 00:03:11,200 --> 00:03:12,200 Well, hey. 61 00:03:12,200 --> 00:03:13,200 That's so true. 62 00:03:13,200 --> 00:03:15,240 You know what we're doing today. 63 00:03:15,240 --> 00:03:18,700 We were just we're capping season two. 64 00:03:18,700 --> 00:03:24,420 We were just talking about the fact that we want double credit for season two episodes 65 00:03:24,420 --> 00:03:28,920 because that would get us the exact same amount of episodes that actually would be like one 66 00:03:28,920 --> 00:03:30,400 more I think because today's 17th. 67 00:03:30,400 --> 00:03:31,400 That'd be 34. 68 00:03:31,400 --> 00:03:34,200 We did 33 last season. 69 00:03:34,200 --> 00:03:39,120 And so then we'd be the same because I do think it is different post pandemic. 70 00:03:39,120 --> 00:03:45,000 In fact, one of the things that happened that Jason and I should probably share with you 71 00:03:45,000 --> 00:03:50,560 is that we pulled this off really only because we prerecorded a bazillion of these. 72 00:03:50,560 --> 00:03:55,600 And then while he went off to, gosh, where'd you go off to? 73 00:03:55,600 --> 00:03:59,080 He went off to several other countries and did other things. 74 00:03:59,080 --> 00:04:01,360 And we were all back. 75 00:04:01,360 --> 00:04:06,300 We had a nice little stack of these things in the corner all ready to go. 76 00:04:06,300 --> 00:04:09,520 And that's kind of the only way we pulled it off, right? 77 00:04:09,520 --> 00:04:10,520 Yeah. 78 00:04:10,520 --> 00:04:13,760 Because we suddenly, I mean, video the pandemic, like all good pandemics. 79 00:04:13,760 --> 00:04:15,400 I think we've all lived through many pandemics. 80 00:04:15,400 --> 00:04:21,320 I remember the 1971 is you have time and then the time just disappears post pandemic. 81 00:04:21,320 --> 00:04:25,120 And so the banking of episodes is kind of critical. 82 00:04:25,120 --> 00:04:27,760 So yeah, no, it's been yeah. 83 00:04:27,760 --> 00:04:30,520 It's actually kind of the opposite of that now actually, right? 84 00:04:30,520 --> 00:04:35,640 I mean, it's almost like the pent up demand makes things just crazy. 85 00:04:35,640 --> 00:04:42,320 I think in fact, Jason and I didn't even pull this particular episode off the way we planned. 86 00:04:42,320 --> 00:04:45,940 We were going to do this, what, a week ago or something and you're like, yeah, not going 87 00:04:45,940 --> 00:04:46,940 to happen, man. 88 00:04:46,940 --> 00:04:47,940 I'm so sorry. 89 00:04:47,940 --> 00:04:48,940 No, no. 90 00:04:48,940 --> 00:04:54,760 I mean, it was, you know, we didn't have a guest that we screwed or anything, so it didn't 91 00:04:54,760 --> 00:04:55,960 make any difference. 92 00:04:55,960 --> 00:04:59,280 But it's interesting just how different it is. 93 00:04:59,280 --> 00:05:03,280 But I'll tell you, I learned a ton. 94 00:05:03,280 --> 00:05:06,180 I mean, I can't believe how much I learned actually this year. 95 00:05:06,180 --> 00:05:10,900 These conversations were so fun and we had so many people who were so real. 96 00:05:10,900 --> 00:05:14,600 So I wanted to ask you just to kick this off. 97 00:05:14,600 --> 00:05:19,720 When you think back to what we had and what we learned and what we got out of a lot of 98 00:05:19,720 --> 00:05:24,640 these conversations, what were some of the highlights for you? 99 00:05:24,640 --> 00:05:32,760 Well I think the societal stuff, like the alcohol free piece, the fake meat thing. 100 00:05:32,760 --> 00:05:36,120 I just found those ones super, super interesting. 101 00:05:36,120 --> 00:05:37,120 And e-cigarettes. 102 00:05:37,120 --> 00:05:40,240 Those three things I just find amazing. 103 00:05:40,240 --> 00:05:43,360 Can we talk about that for a second? 104 00:05:43,360 --> 00:05:49,320 I listened to the e-cigarettes episode this morning. 105 00:05:49,320 --> 00:05:51,080 That is kind of terrifying actually. 106 00:05:51,080 --> 00:05:56,520 I mean, I was, she said twice on the show, she was like, yeah, there's DNA breaks we 107 00:05:56,520 --> 00:06:02,640 observed and you're talking about how they sell them in Australia under the premise that 108 00:06:02,640 --> 00:06:06,240 they don't have any nicotine in them, but they clearly do. 109 00:06:06,240 --> 00:06:07,240 I don't know. 110 00:06:07,240 --> 00:06:14,120 The whole, let me sell you the same addictive substance but dress it up so that you think 111 00:06:14,120 --> 00:06:18,720 it's different is really, really interesting. 112 00:06:18,720 --> 00:06:23,640 And then there are these health harms that I think it's interesting that we haven't heard 113 00:06:23,640 --> 00:06:24,640 more about them. 114 00:06:24,640 --> 00:06:25,640 Right? 115 00:06:25,640 --> 00:06:30,520 I mean, she's clearly perfectly comfortable talking about it, but wow. 116 00:06:30,520 --> 00:06:34,640 I don't know, that to me really punched me in the face. 117 00:06:34,640 --> 00:06:35,640 I'm with you. 118 00:06:35,640 --> 00:06:39,720 And I find like if you drew a theme through so many of the conversations we had, it's 119 00:06:39,720 --> 00:06:46,720 like there are facts around so many of these things and yet they don't rise to the surface 120 00:06:46,720 --> 00:06:48,720 and the general public don't know about them. 121 00:06:48,720 --> 00:06:56,760 Like around the concussion, for example, the e-cigarettes thing or the tiny sachets that 122 00:06:56,760 --> 00:07:00,960 we had in Indonesia with Yobelle. 123 00:07:00,960 --> 00:07:05,480 We know it, but we don't do anything about it. 124 00:07:05,480 --> 00:07:06,480 It's incredible. 125 00:07:06,480 --> 00:07:07,480 Yeah, or Guns and Gambling. 126 00:07:07,480 --> 00:07:08,480 That was a great episode. 127 00:07:08,480 --> 00:07:09,480 I loved it. 128 00:07:09,480 --> 00:07:17,120 Yeah, we finally got that out of the way after talking about that for I think a year. 129 00:07:17,120 --> 00:07:21,560 You know what's interesting about this whole societal thing that we covered, these very 130 00:07:21,560 --> 00:07:32,560 subtle elements of it, I do think there is this problem with humans and things where 131 00:07:32,560 --> 00:07:36,920 causal links are delayed. 132 00:07:36,920 --> 00:07:42,560 It's a really fascinating thing that kind of comes up in my work sometimes when you're 133 00:07:42,560 --> 00:07:48,120 dealing with lawsuits about it because, I'll give you an example. 134 00:07:48,120 --> 00:07:55,000 Smoking is an interesting one because the health effects of smoking take years to usually 135 00:07:55,000 --> 00:07:57,800 get you. 136 00:07:57,800 --> 00:08:03,760 Then when it finally gets you, then you have regret, but there wasn't anything at the time 137 00:08:03,760 --> 00:08:06,000 that sort of got you there. 138 00:08:06,000 --> 00:08:09,480 You get to your old Brenner's situation and he's like, oh, now that it's killing me, I 139 00:08:09,480 --> 00:08:12,420 definitely regret this. 140 00:08:12,420 --> 00:08:16,880 Before that, we struggle with it. 141 00:08:16,880 --> 00:08:23,200 If you felt sick every time you took a puff of a cigarette, you probably wouldn't smoke. 142 00:08:23,200 --> 00:08:26,680 There's this issue with causation and distance. 143 00:08:26,680 --> 00:08:32,040 I was thinking about it, the environment. 144 00:08:32,040 --> 00:08:37,840 There's not an earthquake the second after you do something seismologically like frack 145 00:08:37,840 --> 00:08:41,560 or something. 146 00:08:41,560 --> 00:08:49,320 When putting CO2 in the air, you don't see with your own eyes that this is doing something. 147 00:08:49,320 --> 00:08:51,040 You eat too much food. 148 00:08:51,040 --> 00:08:56,300 You don't feel fatter immediately. 149 00:08:56,300 --> 00:09:01,360 It's just one of those things where, what are we going to do? 150 00:09:01,360 --> 00:09:04,360 That's the thread. 151 00:09:04,360 --> 00:09:08,320 I think what it is, is we don't recognize, we fundamentally don't recognize that we live 152 00:09:08,320 --> 00:09:11,840 in a system and that there's a complexity to the systems. 153 00:09:11,840 --> 00:09:16,720 We need to develop systems thinking, which we do not have at school. 154 00:09:16,720 --> 00:09:17,720 It is like cause-effect. 155 00:09:17,720 --> 00:09:20,800 I do this, then something should happen very soon. 156 00:09:20,800 --> 00:09:23,720 If it doesn't happen soon, maybe that's okay. 157 00:09:23,720 --> 00:09:28,560 Then 20 years of smoking, it's like, oh, that's probably not okay. 158 00:09:28,560 --> 00:09:34,880 I think the newest part of our brain, not the base of the brain, but the newest part 159 00:09:34,880 --> 00:09:42,520 does the problem-solving and the logic piece, I think it does a terrible job of recognizing 160 00:09:42,520 --> 00:09:43,520 that we're in a system. 161 00:09:43,520 --> 00:09:49,960 Now, whether that's a system like the natural world that we live in, in 200 years, we have 162 00:09:49,960 --> 00:09:53,040 absolutely devastated this planet. 163 00:09:53,040 --> 00:09:54,040 Just 200 years. 164 00:09:54,040 --> 00:09:55,920 It's crazy, right? 165 00:09:55,920 --> 00:09:59,520 You know that analogy where we're like two minutes to midnight? 166 00:09:59,520 --> 00:10:06,520 If you think of the history of the planet, in the last three seconds, we have devastated 167 00:10:06,520 --> 00:10:07,520 the planet. 168 00:10:07,520 --> 00:10:12,400 What's fascinating is that we're so arrogant to say we've got to save the planet. 169 00:10:12,400 --> 00:10:14,360 It's like, no, no, the planet's going to be fine. 170 00:10:14,360 --> 00:10:18,720 If we could just all die quickly, then the planet's going to recover beautifully because 171 00:10:18,720 --> 00:10:20,040 that's what systems do. 172 00:10:20,040 --> 00:10:21,800 They can recover. 173 00:10:21,800 --> 00:10:26,620 We as a species are really up against it. 174 00:10:26,620 --> 00:10:32,520 We don't recognize the world we live in, and it's that detached analytical thinking, that 175 00:10:32,520 --> 00:10:37,680 Cartesian thinking from 300 or 400 years ago where we pull ourselves out of a situation, 176 00:10:37,680 --> 00:10:39,360 we look at it, we analyze it. 177 00:10:39,360 --> 00:10:42,140 We don't recognize we're a part of it. 178 00:10:42,140 --> 00:10:44,680 It's a bit like modern medicine, right? 179 00:10:44,680 --> 00:10:49,040 Western medicine is like rather than the holistic Chinese medicine, which is like it's a whole 180 00:10:49,040 --> 00:10:50,040 system. 181 00:10:50,040 --> 00:10:53,920 It's like, I'm going to be a specialist in back surgery. 182 00:10:53,920 --> 00:10:58,560 You don't recognize that, well, it's not just one whole thing. 183 00:10:58,560 --> 00:11:00,240 We just can't do this specialized. 184 00:11:00,240 --> 00:11:02,920 You need to think of it holistically. 185 00:11:02,920 --> 00:11:08,360 That's a great, that's a really, really good analogy because every time I have gone to 186 00:11:08,360 --> 00:11:14,400 a physical therapist for some sports injury or something like that, I'm always stunned 187 00:11:14,400 --> 00:11:20,400 at how well those people understand how things are all connected in your body. 188 00:11:20,400 --> 00:11:26,080 You'll be like, why are you working on the part of my body that doesn't hurt? 189 00:11:26,080 --> 00:11:33,000 They'll be like, well, you'll know this tomorrow because this thing is connected to that thing. 190 00:11:33,000 --> 00:11:36,600 Those people have done some amazing work, at least for me, over the years. 191 00:11:36,600 --> 00:11:40,520 I can't believe what a valuable profession they have. 192 00:11:40,520 --> 00:11:44,240 I think part of it is because they do kind of understand how that all works. 193 00:11:44,240 --> 00:11:45,240 They just have to. 194 00:11:45,240 --> 00:11:46,240 Yeah. 195 00:11:46,240 --> 00:11:47,240 Yeah, they have to. 196 00:11:47,240 --> 00:11:48,240 Right. 197 00:11:48,240 --> 00:11:53,200 Back to this idea, trying to be optimistic because I am pro-human. 198 00:11:53,200 --> 00:11:54,200 Chris, I'm done. 199 00:11:54,200 --> 00:11:55,200 Chris, I'm done. 200 00:11:55,200 --> 00:11:56,200 I'm out. 201 00:11:56,200 --> 00:11:57,200 I'm out. 202 00:11:57,200 --> 00:11:58,200 I'm out. 203 00:11:58,200 --> 00:12:08,240 It's funny you say that because I do have this conversation with people sometimes. 204 00:12:08,240 --> 00:12:13,040 I talk about the problem of when you look at all of these issues, and they're important 205 00:12:13,040 --> 00:12:19,260 issues to look at, but after a while, if you don't tell yourself, yeah, but humans can 206 00:12:19,260 --> 00:12:23,040 do amazing things. 207 00:12:23,040 --> 00:12:28,600 We're capable of all this awesome love and wonderful things. 208 00:12:28,600 --> 00:12:34,360 We heard with one of our guests. 209 00:12:34,360 --> 00:12:36,560 We asked, I believe it was Yobelle. 210 00:12:36,560 --> 00:12:44,480 We were like, how do you deal with the fact that this is so grim? 211 00:12:44,480 --> 00:12:51,000 He goes, you just got to be hopeful and you've got to, whatever you do, you just got to think 212 00:12:51,000 --> 00:12:52,000 about love. 213 00:12:52,000 --> 00:12:54,400 I was like, yeah. 214 00:12:54,400 --> 00:13:00,680 Because we've got our families, we've got our friends, and that is the coolest thing. 215 00:13:00,680 --> 00:13:07,840 We do these amazing things like create the internet, which then causes all sorts of problems. 216 00:13:07,840 --> 00:13:12,080 It's so great that we did it, but then it's like, oh. 217 00:13:12,080 --> 00:13:19,440 Just today, I was looking at this incredible graphic of this thing that puts us in perspective 218 00:13:19,440 --> 00:13:20,920 with the rest of the universe. 219 00:13:20,920 --> 00:13:21,920 Oh, yeah. 220 00:13:21,920 --> 00:13:22,920 Okay. 221 00:13:22,920 --> 00:13:27,560 It is just, at first, you're like, wow, that is such an effective demonstrative exhibit 222 00:13:27,560 --> 00:13:30,280 because I'm thinking like my job. 223 00:13:30,280 --> 00:13:35,520 Then I, and some things really aren't really explainable by the voice or by the text or 224 00:13:35,520 --> 00:13:36,520 whatever. 225 00:13:36,520 --> 00:13:39,480 You really need to see certain things with your eyes. 226 00:13:39,480 --> 00:13:43,880 Then I thought, oh, I hope I don't make people feel terribly small when I share this with 227 00:13:43,880 --> 00:13:51,240 them because it really does make you go, oh, wow. 228 00:13:51,240 --> 00:13:54,600 Even the entire earth is so small. 229 00:13:54,600 --> 00:14:00,680 Even our sun is technically a dwarf sun, a dwarf star. 230 00:14:00,680 --> 00:14:03,880 Things like that, it's like, oh, God. 231 00:14:03,880 --> 00:14:04,880 All right. 232 00:14:04,880 --> 00:14:05,880 It just keeps going. 233 00:14:05,880 --> 00:14:09,040 You think we're getting done with this pretty soon. 234 00:14:09,040 --> 00:14:14,040 This thing from the new space telescope, it just keeps getting bigger and bigger and bigger. 235 00:14:14,040 --> 00:14:15,680 You're like, oh, my God. 236 00:14:15,680 --> 00:14:19,520 You get at the end like these supermassive black holes. 237 00:14:19,520 --> 00:14:21,600 Anyway, you get the idea. 238 00:14:21,600 --> 00:14:31,760 I think there's a huge mental health benefit in reminding ourselves every week of that 239 00:14:31,760 --> 00:14:34,080 thing that we're small, but it's amazing. 240 00:14:34,080 --> 00:14:37,120 It's just the amazingness of it all. 241 00:14:37,120 --> 00:14:40,520 If you can create wonder every week, remembering them. 242 00:14:40,520 --> 00:14:41,520 Right. 243 00:14:41,520 --> 00:14:45,080 I think that's really good. 244 00:14:45,080 --> 00:14:48,920 I think it's an element of cognitive behavior therapy that I think we might have heard this 245 00:14:48,920 --> 00:14:52,440 from Doug Keane, but I can't remember where we were talking about this. 246 00:14:52,440 --> 00:14:55,440 He's like, you can always reframe this in your mind. 247 00:14:55,440 --> 00:15:00,800 It's the point you made about the prefrontal lobe in our brain is not, it feels like the 248 00:15:00,800 --> 00:15:06,120 challenge with it is it's capable of great things, but you have to tell it to wake up. 249 00:15:06,120 --> 00:15:08,380 It doesn't seem to do things on its own. 250 00:15:08,380 --> 00:15:09,760 You have to go, all right, wait a minute. 251 00:15:09,760 --> 00:15:11,280 Let me think about this for a second. 252 00:15:11,280 --> 00:15:16,080 If you don't do that, if you just go with what your natural reaction to things are and 253 00:15:16,080 --> 00:15:25,160 you don't second process that through that advanced part of your brain, then that takes 254 00:15:25,160 --> 00:15:27,200 extra work. 255 00:15:27,200 --> 00:15:31,280 It takes extra work to take something that you're reacting to and then reframe it and 256 00:15:31,280 --> 00:15:32,280 go, wait a minute. 257 00:15:32,280 --> 00:15:33,280 Yes. 258 00:15:33,280 --> 00:15:34,440 Isn't there another way to see it? 259 00:15:34,440 --> 00:15:38,960 I think that's, it's funny because you and I have both managed people. 260 00:15:38,960 --> 00:15:45,240 One of the things I always remember teaching young managers is don't tell people, as much 261 00:15:45,240 --> 00:15:48,560 as you can avoid it, don't tell people not to do things. 262 00:15:48,560 --> 00:15:53,200 Tell them what they should do. 263 00:15:53,200 --> 00:16:00,360 If they are supposed to pull the blue button and they're supposed to push the red button 264 00:16:00,360 --> 00:16:03,840 and you say, hey, don't pull the blue button. 265 00:16:03,840 --> 00:16:10,660 The problem with that is you leave them with blue button, which is in their mind now and 266 00:16:10,660 --> 00:16:14,200 really all you're supposed to do is take the extra step to instead of, the first thing 267 00:16:14,200 --> 00:16:19,520 you will think is, say don't do that. 268 00:16:19,520 --> 00:16:22,020 That's the first thing that enters your mind. 269 00:16:22,020 --> 00:16:24,840 That's like your mammal talking. 270 00:16:24,840 --> 00:16:31,800 Then if you stop for a second and say, no, just tell them to push the blue button. 271 00:16:31,800 --> 00:16:36,480 You have to take that extra step. 272 00:16:36,480 --> 00:16:39,840 Is it more memorable because you're telling them what to do instead of what not to do? 273 00:16:39,840 --> 00:16:41,120 It's more positive. 274 00:16:41,120 --> 00:16:43,760 It's less demeaning and scary. 275 00:16:43,760 --> 00:16:50,200 It's just, anyway, I think the whole thing is fascinating to me what a thread ran through 276 00:16:50,200 --> 00:16:54,280 all of these societal subjects. 277 00:16:54,280 --> 00:16:57,320 I think one of the things you said was around reacting. 278 00:16:57,320 --> 00:17:01,600 There's a whole different world of reacting versus responding. 279 00:17:01,600 --> 00:17:07,480 The seconds that if you can just take that breath, if you can just take that to reframe 280 00:17:07,480 --> 00:17:13,720 a really bad situation or to, if we live in a reactive world, bad things happen, right? 281 00:17:13,720 --> 00:17:14,720 Bad things happen. 282 00:17:14,720 --> 00:17:20,240 That reaction, which is I think flight fight, which is the base of your brain, like, if 283 00:17:20,240 --> 00:17:26,200 you can just hit pause and think a little bit further, you're going to come out with 284 00:17:26,200 --> 00:17:27,960 a much better outcome. 285 00:17:27,960 --> 00:17:32,000 It's trying to do, and that's the whole basis of meditation and a whole bunch of other things 286 00:17:32,000 --> 00:17:36,600 that you can bring into your life. 287 00:17:36,600 --> 00:17:41,080 Stepping back and looking at our season of episodes, it's been a fascinating season looking 288 00:17:41,080 --> 00:17:46,160 at where the world's going, there was some elements around technology, around how we 289 00:17:46,160 --> 00:17:47,360 eat, how we drink. 290 00:17:47,360 --> 00:17:53,680 My son turned 18 on Sunday and in my day, I was drinking since I was like 15 and it 291 00:17:53,680 --> 00:17:56,400 was a very boozy Australian culture. 292 00:17:56,400 --> 00:18:02,000 There was a statistic that 30% of young people are never drinkers, never drinkers. 293 00:18:02,000 --> 00:18:07,960 30% are very intentional drinkers, like they will only drink one or two because they don't 294 00:18:07,960 --> 00:18:13,360 want to hang over and 30% drink like you and me, low functioning alcoholics. 295 00:18:13,360 --> 00:18:17,840 My son went and had his... Sunday he turns 18. 296 00:18:17,840 --> 00:18:20,040 Do you think he ran to the pub on Sunday night? 297 00:18:20,040 --> 00:18:21,040 Nope. 298 00:18:21,040 --> 00:18:26,080 He finally yesterday, which is my Wednesday night, he went down to the local RSL where 299 00:18:26,080 --> 00:18:27,720 you and I have had a beer. 300 00:18:27,720 --> 00:18:29,280 He had half a beer. 301 00:18:29,280 --> 00:18:32,680 He didn't even finish the beer and he came home. 302 00:18:32,680 --> 00:18:35,320 I think it's a fascinating thing. 303 00:18:35,320 --> 00:18:37,000 Here's what's so interesting about that. 304 00:18:37,000 --> 00:18:44,200 Alcohol is way on the way down but nicotine is way on the up. 305 00:18:44,200 --> 00:18:45,200 That's a weird replacement. 306 00:18:45,200 --> 00:18:46,200 It's terrifying. 307 00:18:46,200 --> 00:18:53,800 The doctor that we had on looking at the pulmonary, the health issues, the idea that a vape and 308 00:18:53,800 --> 00:18:56,540 a cigarette is 60 to 120 chemicals. 309 00:18:56,540 --> 00:18:58,940 It's a chemical bomb. 310 00:18:58,940 --> 00:19:02,860 That little cartridge is one packet of cigarettes so you could mindlessly bang through three 311 00:19:02,860 --> 00:19:05,960 or four cartridges a day, which is like three packets of cigarettes. 312 00:19:05,960 --> 00:19:13,560 It's kind of like in alcohol, it's like when you're drinking a really big beer or something 313 00:19:13,560 --> 00:19:14,560 like that. 314 00:19:14,560 --> 00:19:21,120 You're not thinking about the fact that you just had six beers. 315 00:19:21,120 --> 00:19:23,000 You don't want to think about it either. 316 00:19:23,000 --> 00:19:27,120 The reality is this shift is interesting. 317 00:19:27,120 --> 00:19:31,680 Why would... Of course, we never got to this question but why would you have some health 318 00:19:31,680 --> 00:19:37,880 process which is like, okay, I'm associating drinking with more... Not drinking with a 319 00:19:37,880 --> 00:19:39,220 healthier life. 320 00:19:39,220 --> 00:19:40,560 Your son's a surfer. 321 00:19:40,560 --> 00:19:47,280 I could see him being into being a healthy dude. 322 00:19:47,280 --> 00:19:51,160 He's probably got a bunch of friends who vape. 323 00:19:51,160 --> 00:19:55,400 Maybe he doesn't but it sounds like if the odds are what the odds are, maybe. 324 00:19:55,400 --> 00:19:57,440 He has to. 325 00:19:57,440 --> 00:20:03,680 You got to wonder is that because they don't realize how bad it is for you or is it just 326 00:20:03,680 --> 00:20:05,320 ... I don't know. 327 00:20:05,320 --> 00:20:06,320 Who knows? 328 00:20:06,320 --> 00:20:07,320 Or because they don't care. 329 00:20:07,320 --> 00:20:11,520 Maybe because it's like with young people, there's always a certain amount of giving 330 00:20:11,520 --> 00:20:14,760 the finger to society. 331 00:20:14,760 --> 00:20:15,760 That's half the fun. 332 00:20:15,760 --> 00:20:18,520 Do you guys call it the finger? 333 00:20:18,520 --> 00:20:19,520 You guys don't probably call it the finger. 334 00:20:19,520 --> 00:20:20,520 Yeah. 335 00:20:20,520 --> 00:20:21,520 No, we don't. 336 00:20:21,520 --> 00:20:22,520 I think so. 337 00:20:22,520 --> 00:20:23,520 It's nice to know you're on board with the finger. 338 00:20:23,520 --> 00:20:37,600 One of the best jokes I've heard recently was this guy talking in a particular comedy 339 00:20:37,600 --> 00:20:41,600 piece where he said, and then his finger, he locked off his finger. 340 00:20:41,600 --> 00:20:46,200 He couldn't have a middle finger anymore which meant that he was incapable of driving in 341 00:20:46,200 --> 00:20:48,200 Boston anytime soon. 342 00:20:48,200 --> 00:20:50,200 That's a good one. 343 00:20:50,200 --> 00:20:51,200 That is a good one. 344 00:20:51,200 --> 00:20:52,200 I thought you don't really see it coming. 345 00:20:52,200 --> 00:21:02,840 If we go way back, if we go way back to the beginning, I was thinking about how much... I'll 346 00:21:02,840 --> 00:21:03,840 just say it. 347 00:21:03,840 --> 00:21:07,720 How brave and awesome Zane Lamprey was to just be straight with us on what he thought 348 00:21:07,720 --> 00:21:13,820 about taking offense in comedy and what it really means and the realities of it and how 349 00:21:13,820 --> 00:21:17,640 it gets overhyped certain times and where it's legit. 350 00:21:17,640 --> 00:21:21,200 I thought that was really cool that he put that out there. 351 00:21:21,200 --> 00:21:23,240 I was thinking about themes. 352 00:21:23,240 --> 00:21:28,680 I think for the vast majority of our participants were really real with us. 353 00:21:28,680 --> 00:21:31,260 That's really what we've always been going for. 354 00:21:31,260 --> 00:21:33,240 It's an evidence-based thing. 355 00:21:33,240 --> 00:21:38,680 It's as humorous as we can possibly make it with serious subjects and people have got 356 00:21:38,680 --> 00:21:40,240 to be real. 357 00:21:40,240 --> 00:21:42,880 I think we've got that. 358 00:21:42,880 --> 00:21:43,880 I agree. 359 00:21:43,880 --> 00:21:51,000 I think that question around buster myth for us was such a cool mechanism to get at some 360 00:21:51,000 --> 00:21:53,080 of these big things. 361 00:21:53,080 --> 00:21:55,120 I'm stuck on e-cigarettes for some reason. 362 00:21:55,120 --> 00:21:58,760 The idea that people are talking... It was really recently. 363 00:21:58,760 --> 00:22:00,800 It's just water vapor. 364 00:22:00,800 --> 00:22:02,800 I just think that's like, oh yeah, I've heard that. 365 00:22:02,800 --> 00:22:03,800 I've heard that so much. 366 00:22:03,800 --> 00:22:05,760 Oh yeah, it's just water vapor. 367 00:22:05,760 --> 00:22:09,000 It's just something fun to do. 368 00:22:09,000 --> 00:22:15,600 By the way, would I tell you that if I was someone who probably didn't have a very good 369 00:22:15,600 --> 00:22:20,600 moral compass and was trying to sell a lot of things to people and make them addicts? 370 00:22:20,600 --> 00:22:25,760 Particularly if I'm outside the realm of the law and I'm in some other country that you 371 00:22:25,760 --> 00:22:28,240 can't get at me or whatever. 372 00:22:28,240 --> 00:22:33,160 I was also thinking about... I'll give you an example. 373 00:22:33,160 --> 00:22:38,400 Doug Keene's no fan of authoritarianism, but I thought he gave the authoritarianism 374 00:22:38,400 --> 00:22:44,680 versus democracy reality a very good setup. 375 00:22:44,680 --> 00:22:47,680 He didn't bang on about any particular political thing. 376 00:22:47,680 --> 00:22:52,320 He just said, here's what's going on psychologically with it. 377 00:22:52,320 --> 00:22:57,160 I thought that was also really refreshing. 378 00:22:57,160 --> 00:22:59,200 We've learned a lot from him. 379 00:22:59,200 --> 00:23:04,560 Was his conclusion that authoritarianism rises when the populace is fearful? 380 00:23:04,560 --> 00:23:07,720 I think it was... No, not really. 381 00:23:07,720 --> 00:23:12,920 I think you could probably extrapolate that from the conversation. 382 00:23:12,920 --> 00:23:20,880 I think what he was talking about in particular was that... I thought the theme was authoritarianism 383 00:23:20,880 --> 00:23:26,520 is a political system and it is something to be concerned about if you value democracy. 384 00:23:26,520 --> 00:23:33,920 It's also an element of what humans... Some humans need a certain amount of... There's 385 00:23:33,920 --> 00:23:38,080 a strong leader who makes this decision at this point. 386 00:23:38,080 --> 00:23:43,480 He didn't use this example, but the example I was thinking of was again, management consulting 387 00:23:43,480 --> 00:23:47,440 kind of stuff where we used to talk about there's basically three different types of 388 00:23:47,440 --> 00:23:49,140 decisions that you can make. 389 00:23:49,140 --> 00:23:53,600 You can make a consult decision, which is kind of in the middle. 390 00:23:53,600 --> 00:23:58,160 It's like where you go, hey, Jason, what do you think about this? 391 00:23:58,160 --> 00:23:59,700 I got to make a decision about this. 392 00:23:59,700 --> 00:24:03,260 Would you tell me what you think and then I'll make my decision? 393 00:24:03,260 --> 00:24:04,520 That's the consult decision. 394 00:24:04,520 --> 00:24:08,240 The consensus decision is the one that takes the longest, but it's probably the best because 395 00:24:08,240 --> 00:24:10,040 you get everybody. 396 00:24:10,040 --> 00:24:11,440 You get everybody involved. 397 00:24:11,440 --> 00:24:16,100 Then there's the command decision, which is usually not as good, but necessary because 398 00:24:16,100 --> 00:24:17,100 of time. 399 00:24:17,100 --> 00:24:22,400 The best example I can think of is duck. 400 00:24:22,400 --> 00:24:25,320 If I go, duck, and you say, why? 401 00:24:25,320 --> 00:24:30,880 Which is what a lot of people will do. 402 00:24:30,880 --> 00:24:34,000 It's probably too late. 403 00:24:34,000 --> 00:24:38,360 Sometimes you need a strong leader to yell, duck. 404 00:24:38,360 --> 00:24:44,360 I would say the way corporate cultures have developed over the years, there's a real 405 00:24:44,360 --> 00:24:48,160 preference for consensus decisions on everything. 406 00:24:48,160 --> 00:24:51,480 The problem is that doesn't really work. 407 00:24:51,480 --> 00:24:56,480 It works for a lot of things, but the reality is there's a lot of times where you need to 408 00:24:56,480 --> 00:24:57,800 do a consult decision. 409 00:24:57,800 --> 00:25:03,800 I'd say at least once a year, there's a command decision out there that's got to happen. 410 00:25:03,800 --> 00:25:10,880 Why do so many people not like command decisions, I've discovered? 411 00:25:10,880 --> 00:25:13,480 It's because it's authoritarian. 412 00:25:13,480 --> 00:25:15,200 It freaks some people out. 413 00:25:15,200 --> 00:25:23,760 It's like, whoa, you should have to explain to me why I have to duck. 414 00:25:23,760 --> 00:25:25,040 Which is really interesting. 415 00:25:25,040 --> 00:25:29,100 I'm not sure if this is a correlation with the younger generation where everyone feels 416 00:25:29,100 --> 00:25:31,280 like they need to have a say in every decision. 417 00:25:31,280 --> 00:25:36,760 I'm not sure if that's every generation, the younger generation feels that or this particular 418 00:25:36,760 --> 00:25:40,320 generation feels like everyone wants ownership in a decision. 419 00:25:40,320 --> 00:25:45,280 In Japanese culture, there's a thing called temawashi and that is absolutely 90% of decisions 420 00:25:45,280 --> 00:25:50,280 in Japanese companies are consultative and take forever. 421 00:25:50,280 --> 00:25:52,040 The negative is it takes forever. 422 00:25:52,040 --> 00:25:54,040 The positive is everyone's got buy-in. 423 00:25:54,040 --> 00:25:55,640 There is no complaint. 424 00:25:55,640 --> 00:25:57,640 There is no one saying, I didn't have a say. 425 00:25:57,640 --> 00:25:59,560 It's like, no, no, you really did. 426 00:25:59,560 --> 00:26:00,560 That's fascinating. 427 00:26:00,560 --> 00:26:01,560 That's very interesting. 428 00:26:01,560 --> 00:26:08,840 You know what, for some reason that reminded me of, even though I don't know why, Mike 429 00:26:08,840 --> 00:26:14,320 Hanley, when we asked him, is the Be Real app the kind of thing that's going to turn 430 00:26:14,320 --> 00:26:18,000 into something or is it just going to get replaced by one of the other big tools? 431 00:26:18,000 --> 00:26:20,760 He goes, oh, it'll be replaced. 432 00:26:20,760 --> 00:26:22,240 Like flat out. 433 00:26:22,240 --> 00:26:26,200 I was like, oh, all right. 434 00:26:26,200 --> 00:26:27,200 That's so funny. 435 00:26:27,200 --> 00:26:29,120 No fear at all. 436 00:26:29,120 --> 00:26:30,800 I thought that was fantastic. 437 00:26:30,800 --> 00:26:33,880 It was and there's no revenue model in it. 438 00:26:33,880 --> 00:26:38,320 I've not used it since then because it's so boring. 439 00:26:38,320 --> 00:26:41,960 It goes being once a day, you take a photo of yourself, a photo of what you are. 440 00:26:41,960 --> 00:26:48,280 It's like after five days, it's like, I'm so bored and I don't care where you are. 441 00:26:48,280 --> 00:26:52,000 You started to realize that to you, it was a waste of your time. 442 00:26:52,000 --> 00:26:53,000 That's what you were thinking. 443 00:26:53,000 --> 00:26:55,120 You were like, oh, God. 444 00:26:55,120 --> 00:26:58,120 I don't need to give up my time anymore. 445 00:26:58,120 --> 00:27:05,600 I was drawn to it because it's like with the other ones where it's like if the app is free, 446 00:27:05,600 --> 00:27:09,680 then you're the product because they're selling your data. 447 00:27:09,680 --> 00:27:12,200 With Be Real, it's like, well, they're not serving up ads. 448 00:27:12,200 --> 00:27:13,200 That's good. 449 00:27:13,200 --> 00:27:15,080 Then it's like there's no revenue model. 450 00:27:15,080 --> 00:27:18,880 They're just aggregating lots of people and then they're going to flick it to someone. 451 00:27:18,880 --> 00:27:23,840 As Mike said, it's like, yeah, Instagram can knock this off like tomorrow for nothing. 452 00:27:23,840 --> 00:27:25,760 Now, they haven't yet. 453 00:27:25,760 --> 00:27:30,760 But still, I love the fact that he, like everybody I thought, was just super real with us. 454 00:27:30,760 --> 00:27:33,680 It was really fun. 455 00:27:33,680 --> 00:27:34,680 What do you think? 456 00:27:34,680 --> 00:27:40,640 What's coming up for you in the post podcast world? 457 00:27:40,640 --> 00:27:42,960 You're doing all sorts of different things. 458 00:27:42,960 --> 00:27:44,920 I am. 459 00:27:44,920 --> 00:27:49,960 We've got projects up in the South Pacific on the nappy front, which is exciting, World 460 00:27:49,960 --> 00:27:52,560 Bank project, which is kind of cool. 461 00:27:52,560 --> 00:28:00,720 I am toying potentially with another podcast with my son called Teach Me Everything, which 462 00:28:00,720 --> 00:28:06,080 is an idea where I've got four university degrees, I'm 53, and I understand less and 463 00:28:06,080 --> 00:28:08,040 less about the world. 464 00:28:08,040 --> 00:28:12,200 I thought having a young person like my 18-year-old son, and we might have a guest or two I want 465 00:28:12,200 --> 00:28:15,880 to talk about, what is Deepop? 466 00:28:15,880 --> 00:28:18,400 What is Discord? 467 00:28:18,400 --> 00:28:20,240 How does someone do online dating? 468 00:28:20,240 --> 00:28:21,240 Because that's beyond me. 469 00:28:21,240 --> 00:28:25,880 There's a raft of things that I don't get. 470 00:28:25,880 --> 00:28:26,880 I think it's interesting. 471 00:28:26,880 --> 00:28:31,480 It flips the idea of mentor-mentee on its head, because typically a mentor is older, 472 00:28:31,480 --> 00:28:34,360 and the older mentor teaches the mentee something. 473 00:28:34,360 --> 00:28:41,320 But I think nowadays, the digital natives, and you and my generation is the last generation. 474 00:28:41,320 --> 00:28:45,600 We were born in pre-digital land, and now we've had to figure it out. 475 00:28:45,600 --> 00:28:47,080 Digital natives just see the world differently. 476 00:28:47,080 --> 00:28:49,440 I think there's something in there. 477 00:28:49,440 --> 00:28:55,320 We're tinkering around with that, which is quite exciting. 478 00:28:55,320 --> 00:28:57,680 I would totally be a fan of that. 479 00:28:57,680 --> 00:28:58,680 No, really. 480 00:28:58,680 --> 00:29:00,960 If you put that out, I'll listen to it. 481 00:29:00,960 --> 00:29:02,560 That sounds great. 482 00:29:02,560 --> 00:29:07,080 What we're actually doing, we're trying to go to Udemy or Khan Academy, some of these 483 00:29:07,080 --> 00:29:10,120 big online-listed businesses. 484 00:29:10,120 --> 00:29:15,480 You know you can do so many online courses at very low cost, and see if they'll sponsor 485 00:29:15,480 --> 00:29:16,480 us. 486 00:29:16,480 --> 00:29:17,480 It's a neat idea. 487 00:29:17,480 --> 00:29:22,920 Udemy is interesting, because they don't have a podcast, and podcasting is a really cheap, 488 00:29:22,920 --> 00:29:27,960 effective, but entertaining way to bring new customers in for them. 489 00:29:27,960 --> 00:29:30,720 We're toying with, can we get some corporate sponsorship, maybe? 490 00:29:30,720 --> 00:29:31,720 We'll see. 491 00:29:31,720 --> 00:29:32,720 What about you, young Chris? 492 00:29:32,720 --> 00:29:33,720 Love it. 493 00:29:33,720 --> 00:29:36,080 Are you fighting justice? 494 00:29:36,080 --> 00:29:40,080 I'm doing justice through the help of legal teams. 495 00:29:40,080 --> 00:29:42,120 That's a joke. 496 00:29:42,120 --> 00:29:46,080 There's an old retired jury consultant who used to say that. 497 00:29:46,080 --> 00:29:47,080 He was from Texas. 498 00:29:47,080 --> 00:29:48,640 They'd say, what are you doing? 499 00:29:48,640 --> 00:29:50,640 He'd say, we're doing justice. 500 00:29:50,640 --> 00:29:55,960 I always thought that was pretty entertaining. 501 00:29:55,960 --> 00:29:56,960 It's pretty good. 502 00:29:56,960 --> 00:29:57,960 No, yeah. 503 00:29:57,960 --> 00:30:02,800 We're really having fun. 504 00:30:02,800 --> 00:30:12,640 We're working really hard to push the limits on putting together better technology, better 505 00:30:12,640 --> 00:30:14,800 processes. 506 00:30:14,800 --> 00:30:19,480 We're just trying to stay as edgy as we possibly can. 507 00:30:19,480 --> 00:30:22,640 For some reason, that's the kind of thing that keeps me fired up. 508 00:30:22,640 --> 00:30:29,300 I love the mission of being one, just a little bit out in front. 509 00:30:29,300 --> 00:30:33,840 Even if it's impractical sometimes, and even if, I don't know, for some reason that's really 510 00:30:33,840 --> 00:30:35,240 fun. 511 00:30:35,240 --> 00:30:40,960 If you're always thinking, all right, what would help the clients learn more? 512 00:30:40,960 --> 00:30:45,720 I will say, since I don't know if I've ever said this on the show, now is probably a good 513 00:30:45,720 --> 00:30:47,760 time to say it. 514 00:30:47,760 --> 00:30:53,480 One of the things I really like about our profession is, this doesn't get talked about 515 00:30:53,480 --> 00:30:57,200 as much on the show like bull or something where people like, that's what people think 516 00:30:57,200 --> 00:30:59,080 the stuff is. 517 00:30:59,080 --> 00:31:03,160 When you work with some witness who is really having a hard time explaining themselves, 518 00:31:03,160 --> 00:31:07,120 and they're being hit with all these loaded questions from attorneys who do this stuff 519 00:31:07,120 --> 00:31:13,240 every day, and you work with them, with the attorney, and they start to actually learn 520 00:31:13,240 --> 00:31:20,000 how they can do this in a way where they don't sound like they're scared, and they don't 521 00:31:20,000 --> 00:31:30,000 sound like they're stammering, or they don't sound defensive, which can really give people 522 00:31:30,000 --> 00:31:33,360 an inaccurate view of somebody. 523 00:31:33,360 --> 00:31:39,760 I feel like we can help level the playing field for people, for witnesses. 524 00:31:39,760 --> 00:31:46,240 I feel like we can really help level the playing field for, we can help jurors understand this 525 00:31:46,240 --> 00:31:48,520 incredibly complex stuff we've got to do sometimes. 526 00:31:48,520 --> 00:31:55,160 When we're working on patent cases and stuff, I love feeling like, you know what, we're 527 00:31:55,160 --> 00:32:00,040 going to make this, this jury is going to, we're going to make this jury is not just 528 00:32:00,040 --> 00:32:04,120 understanding this, but they're maybe even a little entertained by it, when in fact when 529 00:32:04,120 --> 00:32:09,960 they probably first heard, Mr. Jury, this case is, what they really want to hear is, 530 00:32:09,960 --> 00:32:10,960 this is a murder case. 531 00:32:10,960 --> 00:32:14,800 Or, you know, what they really want to hear, and you know what they get, and they're like, 532 00:32:14,800 --> 00:32:19,680 this is a technology patent case, and people are like, oh, like, no. 533 00:32:19,680 --> 00:32:24,920 Now, sure, all the evidence suggests that when they actually are seated for the jury, 534 00:32:24,920 --> 00:32:28,840 they're all in, and they want to work hard, and they want to do a good job, but prior 535 00:32:28,840 --> 00:32:36,080 to, you know, being seated, I'm sure they're thinking, ooh, two weeks talking about technology 536 00:32:36,080 --> 00:32:37,080 in a courtroom? 537 00:32:37,080 --> 00:32:43,320 I mean, anyway, so I get all fired up sometimes when I'm, when I'm fired up, I get fired up 538 00:32:43,320 --> 00:32:48,000 about the fact that I think we're doing work that is, it's good for people. 539 00:32:48,000 --> 00:32:53,000 It isn't just something you have to do because the legal system exists. 540 00:32:53,000 --> 00:32:54,440 Something we're trying to do well. 541 00:32:54,440 --> 00:32:58,040 So anyway, that's, I think that's, yeah. 542 00:32:58,040 --> 00:33:01,560 That's very cool, and that's, yeah, yeah, that's so cool. 543 00:33:01,560 --> 00:33:02,560 Well, congratulations. 544 00:33:02,560 --> 00:33:04,680 It's going to be an exciting 2023 for you. 545 00:33:04,680 --> 00:33:05,680 Yes. 546 00:33:05,680 --> 00:33:09,160 And I think, I think there could be a chance of a season three if you and I were to be 547 00:33:09,160 --> 00:33:10,160 able to do that. 548 00:33:10,160 --> 00:33:11,160 That would be exciting. 549 00:33:11,160 --> 00:33:14,480 There's, I'm never going to say never. 550 00:33:14,480 --> 00:33:15,480 That's right. 551 00:33:15,480 --> 00:33:16,480 Never say never. 552 00:33:16,480 --> 00:33:17,480 Yep. 553 00:33:17,480 --> 00:33:18,480 Because who knows what could happen? 554 00:33:18,480 --> 00:33:23,560 Plus, I'll tell you, Jason, I just, I'll sign off by saying I always look forward to doing 555 00:33:23,560 --> 00:33:24,640 this with you. 556 00:33:24,640 --> 00:33:29,720 You are a great guy to be able to hang out with all the way across the world digitally. 557 00:33:29,720 --> 00:33:34,920 I'm very, feel so blessed to have met you all those years ago with our kids in the same 558 00:33:34,920 --> 00:33:37,680 school and we always said, wouldn't it be fun to work together? 559 00:33:37,680 --> 00:33:42,880 And then we basically manifested the pandemic, we're sorry, but we manifested the pandemic 560 00:33:42,880 --> 00:33:44,160 to get the podcast going. 561 00:33:44,160 --> 00:33:47,160 Yeah, it's, I mean, it helped us get great ratings. 562 00:33:47,160 --> 00:33:48,160 Yeah, exactly. 563 00:33:48,160 --> 00:33:49,160 Go pandemic. 564 00:33:49,160 --> 00:33:50,160 So yeah, see. 565 00:33:50,160 --> 00:33:57,360 Anybody who thought that we were good guys was just like, oh, I think if these guys had 566 00:33:57,360 --> 00:34:02,160 a vaping company, they'd be killing it. 567 00:34:02,160 --> 00:34:04,400 It'd be awesome. 568 00:34:04,400 --> 00:34:08,040 Well, we've overstayed our welcome to our very consistent. 569 00:34:08,040 --> 00:34:09,040 We have. 570 00:34:09,040 --> 00:34:11,920 Yeah, so I will see you soon. 571 00:34:11,920 --> 00:34:15,360 I'm looking for opportunities that you and I will get together in person as hard as that 572 00:34:15,360 --> 00:34:16,360 is. 573 00:34:16,360 --> 00:34:23,640 But in the meantime, good luck on your endeavors and thanks for a great season too. 574 00:34:23,640 --> 00:34:25,000 That was a wonderful season too. 575 00:34:25,000 --> 00:34:26,000 Thank you. 576 00:34:26,000 --> 00:34:27,000 Thanks everyone. 577 00:34:27,000 --> 00:34:28,000 Bye everybody. 578 00:34:28,000 --> 00:34:35,000 Thank you for joining us at the Recombobulator Lab with Chris Dominic and Jason Graham-Nye. 579 00:34:35,000 --> 00:34:36,000 Catch you next time. 580 00:34:36,000 --> 00:34:36,240 Stay blessed und

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